Unladylike: Resources for Teaching Women’s History from PBS Learning Media

https://cet.pbslearningmedia.org/collection/womens-history-month/

Dr. David J. Childs, D.D., Ph.D.
Northern Kentucky University

Introduction
Social studies and languages arts classrooms are wonderful spaces to introduce topics centered on diversity and inclusion. It is good to start teaching concepts of diversity and equity at an early age, as it will help students be more open minded towards those different than themselves. Educators often need resources to help them implement a more multicultural curriculum into their classrooms. In honor of women’s history month, PBS Learning Media has developed a collection of resources entitled “UnladyLike.”


Daisy Bates (Civil Rights Activist) with six members of the Little Rock Nine.
Courtesy of Independent Television Service.

PBS Website Description
There are a number of wonderful resources available on the site. It presents a diversity of women from various walks of life. Depending how the site is used, elementary, middle grades and secondary elementary teachers can implement these resources into their curriculum. The description on the PBS website states: 

“These digital resources present the rich history of 26 little-known Progressive Era women, diverse in profession, race, ethnicity, geographical and class backgrounds, sexual orientation and gender expression, who broke barriers in then-male-dominated fields such as science, business, journalism, exploration, and the arts. Touching on topics such as the labor movement, immigration, politics, civil rights, and women’s suffrage, these resources develop students’ historical thinking skills and help them make connections between past and present. Unladylike2020 is a timeless resource that was created to honor the centennial of women’s suffrage in August 2020. Recordings of the Unladylike2020 Webinar Series Elevating the Hidden History of American Women are now available…” on the website as well. 

Conclusion
There is a growing effort to limit the exposure of students to a more diverse curriculum. It is ever more important that our students be exposed to conversations surrounding social justice. In this same way, parents that homeschool their children can also use these as teaching resources, even if schools limit what students can be exposed to.   

2 Comments

  1. I really enjoyed reading this article, I think it has a lot of good information and high-quality resources. I loved how in the beginning of the article it talks about the importance of introducing equity and diversity to children at a young age, so they can be more open minded towards those different than themselves. I believe that this is extremely important, and we should focus on building upon children’s curiosity- and to teach them to be understanding & respectful towards others different than themselves rather than instilling judgement/hate like societal structures and institutions often do.

  2. I really enjoyed this article and all of its resources. I think it could be very beneficial in the classroom. I like the article touches on the fact that it is really important to teach diversity in the classroom, but people are trying to limit teacher’s voices, and that’s why its more important than ever.

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