Can Elementary Educators Address Diversity and Equity Issues?

Students in Bret Turner's class working quietly. (Stephanie Lister/KQED)

Dr. David J. Childs, Ph.D.
Northern Kentucky University

Can elementary teachers address topics surrounding equity, social justice, civics or even racism in a meaningful and age appropriate way? Or should a curriculum that addresses social justice and equity be relegated to the middle and secondary classroom? What about having conversations about prejudice and discrimination in Pk-2 classrooms? Would topics such as these be considered inappropriate? Would the material be too sensitive for such young ears? The common assumption is that any conversations in the area of social justice can only take place at the middle and secondary level? However, these topics can be addressed at any grade level. In fact, the earlier the better. Teachers just have to use a developmentally appropriate pedagogy.

Ideas for Starting Conversations
Teachers can connect conversations and lessons on racism to a unit on bullying. Even very young children can grasp the idea that it is wrong to tease or make fun of others because they are different. Lessons and pedagogy rooted in empathy can really help in having these conversations with elementary students, even those in pre-school through second grade classrooms. Here are some great lessons on bullying in early grades.

Another idea is to give certain students special privileges because of their hair color. The teacher might give students extra candy, a special eraser, a sticker, the privilege of erasing the board or more time on the computer. When the first group seems to be enjoying their extra privileges teachers can switch and pick a different hair color to reward. At the end of the activity each student will have been in a group where they did not receive extra privileges. At this point, teachers can have students free write or draw, then discuss how it feels to be treated differently because of who they are. This activity taps into student empathy, letting them know how it feels to be treated differently for something one has no control over. From here, connections can be easily made to discussing racism. It is helpful to use inquiry based pedagogy that teaches students questioning strategies that help them think deeper about social justice issues.

We have included other resources below that can assist educators in teaching topics surrounding issues of equity and civics in elementary classrooms.  

Videos:
Arthur on Racism: Talk, Listen, and Act | ARTHUR
Becoming a Citizen | ARTHUR
Speaking Out | ARTHUR
Finding Solutions | ARTHUR

Lesson Plans/Resources
Forgiveness | An ARTHUR Interactive Comic
Cultural Connections
A Folktale Play
Let’s Dance
TV Star

Other Resources
Teaching 6-Year-Olds About Privilege and Power
Black Lives Matter BrainPop
Racism Lesson Plan for Elementary School

Check out Dr. Jessica Klanderud at Berea College’s Carter G. Woodson Center and her animated videos teaching African American history to elementary students entitled: Ruling Through Race Part 1.

3 Comments

  1. I agree that primary school teachers may start talking about how to treat everyone fairly and respectfully, as well as how to teach pupils about bullying. There are so many fantastic materials to utilize to start these dialogues, and I’m confident that I’ll use all these resources in my own lesson to do so.

  2. I think that children this young would greatly benefit from understanding privilege and how it makes them feel. I also think that after an opportunity is done that students must understand that it is not fair to mistreat someone else because they don’t have a privilege.

  3. I really liked reading this article because I think it will benefit me as a future teacher. Teaching tough topics is a part of the job, but these resources can alleviate some of the stress that comes along with it. Utilizing these tools can make this an easier conversation to have with students. It is important that we tailor these conversations to the age we are with so that they understand the topic and are able to decide for themselves where they stand and who they will stand for.

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